Ancient Egypt: Thinking about these Lives




Imhotep, the quiet achiever, gives his name to one of the most remarkable lives of St Germain. In contrast to St Germain’s usual persona of front-line, larger than life characters, Imhotep, and those who share his energy of the Imhotep line, are no-frills, nose to the grindstone, dependable men like Captain James Cook or President Harry Truman. Explorers, navigators, scientists, architects, doctors, politicians, lawyers, physicians, presidents, philosophers, and warriors, they are always meticulous, exact and hardworking. They will deliver, like Imhotep himself, on the toughest missions and his mission was to accelerate Egyptian civilization. The Imhotep line is one of the lines of the vast energy called St Germain. When all lines are taken together, they give us a picture of the embrace of contradictions within him.


Let’s divide his millions of lives into lines. The first line of St Germain is that of the Comte de Saint-Germain himself: the international diplomat: urbane, suave, charming, super intelligent, multi-lingual, the founder of nations. It has another dimension of this first line as well. I call it the Boaz line of upright, saintly, courageous men who too exercise power, but their incorruptibility can absolutely be relied on. They fight for reform; they liberate the oppressed and are some of the best orators ever created. Joseph of Arimathea, St Patrick, and St Columba are examples.


The Dante line captures St Germain as a creature of romance. Here are his lives as poets, dramatists, writers, dreamers, diplomats, artists, actors, musicians, and dancers. Dante, formerly Homer, wrote a long love letter to his beloved Beatrix, formerly Nefertari, and as he did, he created the Italian language... Music permeates St Germain’s creativity. I am often asked about the energies of the four Beatles. Two were Hilarion, one was a Kuthumi, and one was St Germain...